Canadian

Komatsu chases 20% of global forestry equipment market

Canadian Forestry News - Wed, 2021-04-07 03:26
Japanese equipment maker Komatsu hopes to generate 140 billion yen (US$1.27 billion) in revenue from forest machinery after four years, which would mark a 40% increase, due to robust housing and material demand. Source: Nikkei Asia Komatsu intends to fulfill its goal by offering a stronger line-up of equipment such as feller bunchers and forwarders for the North American market. The US has the fourth largest distribution of forests in the world, in terms of area. Up to now, Komatsu’s forestry equipment has been compatible with the European logging process in which timber is carefully arranged on the spot before being hauled out. For North America, the company will also offer equipment that will carry timber as is to processing centres. Komatsu will develop the Russian and Southeast Asian markets as well. Indonesia and Russia still rely heavily on chainsaws wielded by human hands. While Western logging industries have a 70-80% penetration of forestry machinery, Asia remains behind at roughly 20%. Komatsu’s equipment will compensate for the labour shortage and improve on-site productivity. In the interest of climate change, the manufacturer will also invest resources into promoting reforestation, selling bulldozer-like equipment for prepping the ground, along with automated tree planters. The global market for forestry equipment is growing by 2% to 3% a year on average. This sector outpaces that for the construction machinery market, which rises at a roughly 1% clip. Komatsu hopes to nurture forestry equipment into its third-largest money maker, behind machinery for civil engineering and mining. By the fiscal year ending March 2025, it looks to capture a 20% global share in forestry equipment.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

SVEZA UV Color enters markets of North America and Europe

Canadian Forestry News - Fri, 2021-03-26 10:51
SVEZA started to supply special-purpose UV-coated colour plywood to markets of North America and Europe. The new product of SVEZA UV Color is a unique one and no similar products are made in Russia. This is a prospective direction for SVEZA which headed for production of construction and finishing materials of birch plywood to suit […]
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

New assessment shines a light on the state of North America’s fireflies

Canadian Forestry News - Fri, 2021-03-26 06:08
Iconic, romanticized, and celebrated, fireflies illuminate the evenings and twilight memories of people around the globe. For years, naturalists and conservationists have noted, anecdotally, that fireflies seem to be in decline, but little was known about their conservation status, until now. Researchers from the Xerces Society, the ABQ BioPark, and the IUCN Firefly Specialist Group have just completed […]
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

Earth had its coolest February on record since 2014

Canadian Forestry News - Mon, 2021-03-15 02:00
February 2021 was the planet's coolest February in seven years due to La Niña in the tropical Pacific Ocean and unusually brisk temperatures that enveloped much of North America and northern Asia.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

WestRock sells South Carolina sawmill to Interfor for $59 million in cash

Canadian Forestry News - Fri, 2021-03-12 08:50
British Columbia-based Interfor, one of North America’s largest lumber producers, has bought WestRock’s South Carolina sawmill for $59 million in cash. The sawmill is located 65 miles southwest of Interfor’s existing Georgetown, S.C. mill and 115 miles northeast of its Meldrim, Georgia mill. Interfor says this strategic positioning will allow for log sort optimization and […]
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

How fast does a white-tailed deer run? Candid Animal Cam spots fawns

Canadian Forestry News - Tue, 2021-03-09 11:41
Camera traps bring you closer to the secretive natural world and are an important conservation tool to study wildlife. This week we’re meeting the smallest members of the North American deer family: the white-tailed deer. A white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is a medium-sized mammal that lives in all of the Americas, from Canada to Peru […]
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Segezha ClearPly Hits International Markets on a Large Scale

Canadian Forestry News - Thu, 2021-03-04 04:35
Late 2020 saw Segezha Group, a Sistema company, launch its domestic plywood product Segezha ClearPly across a wide range of international markets. The product’s quality and usability have already been noted by customers in North America, Australia, and New Zealand. Segezha ClearPly is offered in two coating options: transparent and semi-transparent. The second option features […]
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One of the 'world's worst' invasive species is threatening our turtle population

Canadian Forestry News - Mon, 2021-03-01 02:00
They may seem harmless at first glance but the North American red-eared slider turtle is spreading across Sydney's water basins and threatens the biosecurity of our native turtle populations.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

Breakthrough in study of fish kidney disease related to climate change

Canadian Forestry News - Mon, 2021-03-01 02:00
New research from the University of Aberdeen could pave the way for the development of drugs and vaccines to treat a disease that is rapidly emerging in wild and farmed fish in the UK, Europe and North America, as a result of climate change.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

Climate impacts drive east-west divide in forest seed production

Canadian Forestry News - Tue, 2021-02-23 02:00
Younger, smaller trees that comprise much of North America's eastern forests have increased their seed production under climate change, but older, larger trees that dominate forests in much of the West have been less responsive, a new Duke University-led study finds.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

Nursery regenerating Sugar Pines for next generation

Canadian Forestry News - Fri, 2021-02-19 02:21
Owners of the Batlow based Gould’s nursery are happy to report that natural regeneration from Bago State Forest has been successfully propagated for a new Sugar Pine planting. The Sugar Pine Walk was sadly destroyed in Dunns Road fire. Gould’s Nursery is working with Forestry Corporation to grow the next generation of Sugar Pines. Source: Timberbiz Nursery owner Jamie Gould said there was a scattering of pine seedlings under a patch of 1930s Sugar Pine close to the famous Laurel Hill attraction. “Forestry Corporation’s Ben Wielinga dropped in one day with a photo of recently germinated seedlings on Central Logging Road,” Mr Gould said. “It was only three months since the fire — the seedlings were still coming up and no taller than your index finger. “At that stage we were not sure if they would transplant well or even if they were definitely Sugar Pine.” Sugar Pine seeds can’t be bought in Australia. The species is threatened in its native North America and biosecurity prevents seed from being imported. Locally, the hefty cones are a favourite food source for cockatoos. Forestry Corporation was keen to establish another Sugar Pine planting as the original had been so popular with locals and tourists. Ben Wielinga from Forestry Corporation said the Sugar Pine Walk was an iconic local destination. “We ran a photography competition to commemorate it after the fires and over 300 people sent in their favourite photographic memories of the site.” “Finalists were collated into a coffee table book and the Sugar Pine Walk Memories book is available on the website.” The Gould’s were enthusiastic to help create a new Sugar Pine Walk. Jamie and his two children Riley and Rayleigh rescued around 1700 seedlings from the site in March 2020 in partnership with Forestry Corporation. “It was a family effort over a couple of weekends to collect the seedlings from the under the burnt trees,” he said. “Growing the seedlings in the nursery has been an interesting challenge. “It is also nice to be involved in renewal following the fires. I won’t be alive to see these sugar pine mature as they take tens of years to reach maturity, but hopefully future generations will.” The bulk of the seedlings will be replanted as a replacement to the former Sugar Pine Walk, with 192 also donated to the National Arboretum in Canberra for their botanical collection. While planning for the replacement walk is well underway, the former site is still having an impact on the local community. Forestry Corporation donated some of the salvaged sugar pine wood to community groups around the region to support their fundraising activities.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

Climate Change And Suppression Tactics Critical Factors Increasing Fires

Canadian Forestry News - Fri, 2021-02-19 02:00
The millions of people affected by 2020's record-breaking and deadly fires can attest to the fact that wildfire hazards are increasing across western North America.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

Eco-fusion is the new normal, as native and non-native species mix together

Canadian Forestry News - Thu, 2021-02-18 02:00
The ruddy duck, originally from North America, was introduced to Britain as an ornamental wildfowl in the 1940s and soon spread throughout the country. Only after a decade or more of expensive culling, has this non-native duck been largely removed.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

Wintering bird communities track climate change faster than breeding communities in Europe and North America

Canadian Forestry News - Wed, 2021-02-17 02:00
A study recently completed in Europe and North America indicates that the composition of wintering and breeding bird communities changes in line with global warming. However, wintering bird communities are considerably faster at tracking the changing climate compared to breeding communities.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

World's oldest DNA reveals how mammoths evolved

Canadian Forestry News - Wed, 2021-02-17 02:00
An international team led by researchers at the Centre for Palaeogenetics in Stockholm has sequenced DNA recovered from mammoth remains that are up to 1.2 million years old. The analyses show that the Columbian mammoth that inhabited North America during the last ice age was a hybrid between the woolly mammoth and a previously unknown genetic lineage of mammoth.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

Climate Change Likely Drove The Extinction Of North America's Megafauna

Canadian Forestry News - Tue, 2021-02-16 02:00
A new study published in Nature Communications suggests that the extinction of North America's largest mammals was not driven by overhunting by rapidly expanding human populations following their entrance into the Americas.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

Climate change likely drove the extinction of North America's largest animals

Canadian Forestry News - Tue, 2021-02-16 02:00
A new study published in Nature Communications suggests that the extinction of North America's largest mammals was not driven by overhunting by rapidly expanding human populations following their entrance into the Americas.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

How skiing can survive climate change

Canadian Forestry News - Thu, 2021-02-11 02:00
Downhill skiing could become an increasingly exotic proposition in a warming world. By midcentury, the U.S. could see 90 fewer days below freezing each year, according to a 2016 study published in the Journal of Climate and based on data from the federally funded North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program. Nearly all ski areas in the U.S. are projected to have at least a 50% shorter season by 2050, according to a 2017 study funded by the Environmental Protection Agency and published in the Global Environmental Change journal.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

How German scientists track the origin of wood to prevent illegal trade

Canadian Forestry News - Fri, 2021-02-05 01:43
Gerald Koch hurries through a narrow corridor and into his testing laboratory. Inside, employees are squinting through microscopes and peering into screens showing cells and vessels.  Source: International Forest Industries Magazine Part of Hamburg’s Thuenen Institute, the boldly named Centre of Competence on the Origin of Timber is in an unassuming brick building in the city’s northeast. Only its garden of trees from around the world hint at what is going on inside — one of Europe’s most sophisticated operations in the fight to stop the illegal wood trade. “We have already tested large quantities of garden furniture and wooden Easter bunnies,” says Koch. “Now we are expecting the usual flood of wooden toys for Christmas in spring — after all, we test anti-cyclically.” The global wood trade is bigger than ever. Despite our digital age and allegedly paperless society, twice as much wood is harvested and sold worldwide as 50 years ago. This growth in demand has been accompanied by a surge in illegal logging. According to a  study by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), 16 to 19 percent of wood imports to the European Union come from illegal sources. The effects are insidious — deforested jungles, destroyed habitats — and consumers are unknowingly complicit. In 2016, the U.S. flooring giant Lumber Liquidators paid $13 million in fines for selling Chinese-made products made from illegally logged Russian wood. This is where Koch comes in. He’s seen it all. Fruit knives with fine mahogany handles. A fish sculpture carved from teak. Guitar fingerboards made of protected rosewood. Tables constructed of 20 types of tropical timber. “The Asian manufacturer had declared eucalyptus,” scoffs Koch, for whom spotting phony certificates and forged customs declarations is all in a day’s work. Since 2013, the European Union Timber Regulation (EUTR) has banned illegally felled timber from the European market. Customs officers can confiscate it, and carpenters, hardware stores and manufacturers must prove the origin of their timber before selling it. Even private citizens are obliged to make sure their wood is legally sourced. Selling grandma’s antique writing desk could be against the law if it was constructed from a species of wood that’s protected today. The problem is that wood is difficult to distinguish and even harder to source. It’s no easy task even for the scientists at the Centre of Competence, which Koch directs. Together with a 15-member team, Koch is responsible for ensuring that timber products imported not only through Hamburg are what they claim to be. The samples in the lab that day illustrate the enormity of their task: glasses with chipboard crumbs, crushed cardboard coffee cups, colourful bamboo children’s crockery, bags of charcoal and walnut parquet boards – all of it supposedly legally sourced, but is it? Koch takes a cube-sized block of plywood between his thumb and forefinger. “Laminated wood boards contain up to 10 different types of wood, often from the same number of countries,” he says. Before 2013, most of these products would have been sold unchecked. Today, if their origin is questionable, most end up here at the Centre of Competence, a critical checkpoint that helps save forests around the world. With solid wood, an employee saws the sample into cubes and boils them until soft, then planes it into 0.02 millimetre slices so it can examined under a microscope. The scientists identify the wood’s anatomical features, comparing them with the institute’s 50,000 microscopic samples, all of them logged in a digital database. The database calls up the most important of the 100 defined anatomical features, reducing the number of possible species of the sample down to a handful. Usually, the process takes less than an hour. “But sometimes the determination takes several hours, or in rare cases, even days,” says Koch. In those cases, he and his team turn to larger, international databases or the Centre’s in-house wood collection. There are about 35,000 samples of 12,000 species of wood stored here. Many of them still bear the inscription of the predecessor institute founded in 1939. The Centre of Competence has also developed new methods using gene markers to determine where a piece of wood originally grew, accurate to within a few hundred meters. For this, they need reference samples from the region in question. The process of building out complete collections of these samples will take years, but they’ve already covered the entire region of origin of white oak from North America, Europe and Asia, as well as European and Siberian larch, all of which are among the most traded woods of recent years. Meanwhile, they’ve scored more than a few coups. In 2018 Koch and his team detected illegal tropical wood in barbecue charcoal briquettes. The principal was the WWF which investigated 60 charcoal brands. With the help of Koch, they found out that fully one-third of the contents of the briquettes were improperly declared. The result shook the industry, and one of the largest charcoal producers was stripped of their sustainable forestry accreditation. The charcoal scandal was revelatory not only for its reach, but the way it was unearthed. Brittle charcoal briquets can’t be sliced, so the scientists broke it into pieces. They placed the broken edges under a 3D microscope that was developed only a few years ago, scanning the different heights of the fractured planes and assembling them into an image. Within a few seconds, a high-quality reproduction had been produced, showing pores, storage cells and other distinguishing features, which were used to determine the species of wood, even though it was burnt to a crisp. The wood detectives also developed new methods for examining paper, which allowed them to work with Greenpeace to detect ramin wood in the paper of a Chinese manufacturer in Indonesia. Ramin, a threatened species that’s been targeted by illegal traders for years, is protected by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The swamp forests of ramin in Borneo and Sumatra provide a critical habitat for Indonesia’s orangutans, […]
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

As climate warms, summer monsoons to produce less streamflow

Canadian Forestry News - Tue, 2021-02-02 02:00
In the summer of 2019, Desert Research Institute (DRI) scientist Rosemary Carroll, Ph.D., waited for the arrival of the North American Monsoon, which normally brings a needed dose of summer moisture to the area where she lives in Crested Butte, Colo. - but for the fourth year in a row, the rains never really came.
Categories: Canadian, Forestry, News

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